Olson, Valerie

 

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Valerie Olson is Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Irvine.


On Rorotoko:


On her book Into the Extreme: U.S. Environmental Systems and Politics beyond Earth
(Our Cover Feature of June 25, 2018)

 

Porter, Theodore

 

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Theodore M. Porter is a historian of science and Distinguished Professor of History at UCLA, where he has taught for about 25 years. His publications have mainly concerned the history of statistics, data, measurement, and calculation, especially in the human sciences. His previous books include The Rise of Statistical Thinking (1986), Trust in Numbers: The Pursuit of Objectivity in Science and Public Life (1995), and Karl Pearson: The Scientific Life in a Statistical Age (2004).

 


On Rorotoko:


On his book Genetics in the Madhouse: The Unknown History of Human Heredity
(Our Cover Feature of June 18, 2018)

 

Stanford, Craig

 

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Craig Stanford is Professor of Biological Sciences and Anthropology at the University of Southern California. He has conducted field research on chimpanzees and other animals for 30 years in Africa and Asia. He is best known for his research on chimpanzee hunting and meat-eating in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, in collaboration with Jane Goodall. Stanford holds a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley and is the author of 16 books and 150 articles on animal behavior and conservation. His research has been supported by numerous grants from the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright Foundation, and the National Geographic Society, among others. His most recent book is The New Chimpanzee: A 21st Century Portrait of Our Closest Kin. He is deeply involved in wildlife conservation and lectures around the world on the need to preserve biodiversity in all its forms.

 


On Rorotoko:


On his book The New Chimpanzee: A Twenty-First-Century Portrait of Our Closest Kin
(Our Cover Feature of June 11, 2018)

 

Webber, David

 

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David Webber is the author of The Rise of the Working-Class Shareholder: Labor’s Last Best Weapon, published by Harvard University Press and featured in his Rorotoko interview. He has also published scholarly articles including “The Use and Abuse of Labor’s Capital” in the New York University Law Review and “The Plight of the Individual Investor in Securities Class Actions” in the Northwestern University Law Review.  Webber has presented his research at the Harvard Stanford Yale Junior Faculty Forum, the Conference on Empirical Legal Studies, and the American Law and Economics Association conference, among others. He has published op-eds in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, and Reuters. He has been interviewed by television, radio, and print media, including Nightly Business Report, NPR’s Marketplace, Bloomberg Radio, The Majority Report with Sam Seder, The David Pakman Show, Knowledge@Wharton Business Radio, CSPAN’s BookTV, Agence France-Presse, Reuters, and others. Webber is the winner of Boston University School of Law’s 2017 Michael Melton Award for Teaching Excellence. He is a graduate of Columbia and NYU Law School, where he was an editor for the law review.


On Rorotoko:


On his book The Rise of the Working-Class Shareholder: Labor’s Last Best Weapon
(Our Cover Feature of June 04, 2018)

 

Anger, Jenny

 

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Jenny Anger is professor of art history at Grinnell College. Her book, Four Metaphors of Modernism: From Der Sturm to the Société Anonyme (University of Minnesota Press, 2018), which is featured in her Rorotoko interview, examines the centrality of metaphor in the creative output of both arts organizations, arguing for a reassessment of modernism in general. Her first book, Paul Klee and the Decorative in Modern Art (Cambridge University Press, 2004) explored the critical role of the decorative in that artist’s career and in modern art. Anger received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Brown University.

 


On Rorotoko:


On her book Four Metaphors of Modernism: From Der Sturm to the Société Anonyme
(Our Cover Feature of May 21, 2018)

 

Frampton, Martyn

 

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Martyn Frampton is Reader in Modern History at Queen Mary University of London. His research interests include the politics of Islamist movements, Anglo-US foreign policy in the Middle East, and modern Irish history. He is the author of four books and numerous articles. His earlier works were focused primarily on ‘the Troubles’ in Northern Ireland and, in particular, the history of the Irish republican movement. Latterly, he has expanded his research ambit, learning Arabic and focusing on the history of the Muslim Brotherhood.

 


On Rorotoko:


On his book The Muslim Brotherhood and the West: A History of Enmity and Engagement
(Our Cover Feature of May 14, 2018)

 

Weintraub, David

 

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David Weintraub received his Bachelor’s degree in Physics and Astronomy at Yale in 1980 and his PhD in Geophysics & Space Physics at UCLA in 1989. He is a Professor of Astronomy at Vanderbilt University and is the 2015 winner of the Klopsteg Award from the American Association of Physics Teachers, which recognizes the outstanding communication of the excitement of contemporary physics to the general public. His books include Religions and Extraterrestrial Life: How Will We Deal With It? (Springer, 2014), How Old is the Universe? (Princeton University Press, 2010), and Is Pluto a Planet? (Princeton University Press, 2006), as well as Life on Mars (Princeton, 2018), featured in his Rorotoko interview. He has also authored over 70 peer-reviewed papers in professional journals and co-written seven astronomy books for children.

 


On Rorotoko:


On his book Life on Mars: What to Know Before We Go
(Our Cover Feature of May 07, 2018)

 

Zacka, Bernardo

 

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Bernardo Zacka is a Junior Research Fellow in political theory at Christ’s College, Cambridge. He will be starting as an assistant professor of political science at MIT in September 2018.


On Rorotoko:


On his book When the State Meets the Street: Public Service and Moral Agency
(Our Cover Feature of April 30, 2018)

 

Escobar, Arturo

 

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Arturo Escobar is professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He has been visiting professor at universities in Argentina, Ecuador, Catalunya, Finland, the Netherlands, and England. His main interests are political ecology, design, anthropology of development, social movements, and technoscience. His most well-known book is Encountering Development: The Making and Unmaking of the Third World (1995; 2nd edition, 2011). Besides Designs for the Pluriverse (2018), which is featured in his Rorotoko interview, he is also the author of Territories of Difference: Place, Movements, Life, Redes (2008); Sentipensar con la Tierra (2014); and Autonomía y diseño: la realización de lo comunal (2016), among other works.

 


On Rorotoko:


On his book Designs for the Pluriverse: Radical Interdependence, Autonomy, and the Making of Worlds
(Our Cover Feature of April 23, 2018)

 

Igo, Sarah

 

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Sarah E. Igo is an Associate Professor of History and the Director of American Studies at Vanderbilt University. A graduate of Harvard and Princeton, she teaches and writes about modern American cultural and intellectual history. Her first book, The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public, explored the relationship between survey data—opinion polls, sex surveys, consumer research—and modern understandings of self and nation. Igo’s new book is The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in Modern America, published by Harvard University Press and featured in her Rorotoko interview.

 


On Rorotoko:


On her book The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in Modern America
(Our Cover Feature of April 09, 2018)

 

Cohen, Warren

 

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Warren I. Cohen is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Michigan State University and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and a Senior Scholar in the Asia Program of the Woodrow Wilson Center. He has written thirteen books and edited eight others. He served as a line officer in the U.S. Pacific Fleet, editor of Diplomatic History, President of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, and chairman of the Department of State Advisory Committee on Historical Diplomatic Documentation. In addition to scholarly publications, he has written for the Atlantic, Baltimore Sun, Christian Science Monitor, Dissent, Foreign Affairs, International Herald Tribune, Los Angeles Times, The Nation, New York Times, Times Literary Supplement, and the Washington Post. He has also been a consultant on Chinese affairs to various government organizations.

 


On Rorotoko:


On his book A Nation Like All Others: A Brief History of American Foreign Relations
(Our Cover Feature of April 02, 2018)

 

Duina, Francesco

 

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Francesco Duina received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University in 1996. He is Professor of Sociology at Bates College (USA) and Honorary Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia (Canada). He has published widely on economic, political, and cultural sociology. His books include Winning: Reflections on an American Obsession (Princeton University Press), The Social Construction of Free Trade: The EU, NAFTA, and Mercosur (Princeton University Press), and Institutions and the Economy (Polity Press).

 


On Rorotoko:


On his book Broke and Patriotic: Why Poor Americans Love Their Country
(Our Cover Feature of March 26, 2018)

 

Komlosy, Andrea

 

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Andrea Komlosy is professor at the Institute for Economic and Social History, University of Vienna, Austria, where she is coordinating the Global History and Global Studies programs. She has published on labor, migration, borders, and uneven development on the regional, European, and global scale. Recently, she published a chapter, “Work and Labor Relations,” in Capitalism: The Re-Emergence of a Historical Concept (Bloomsbury, 2016) and the book Work: The Last 1,000 Years (Verso, 2018), which is featured in her Rorotoko interview.

 


On Rorotoko:


On her book Work: The Last 1,000 Years
(Our Cover Feature of March 19, 2018)

 

Nassar, Maha

 

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Maha Nassar is assistant professor in the School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies at the University of Arizona. She holds a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago. She is the author of several scholarly articles that have appeared in the Journal of Palestine Studies and Arab Studies Journal, among others. Dr. Nassar is also a Public Voices Fellow with the OpEd Project whose articles have appeared in The Washington Post, The Conversation, and Middle East Report.


On Rorotoko:


On her book Brothers Apart: Palestinian Citizens of Israel and the Arab World
(Our Cover Feature of March 12, 2018)

 

Warchol, Greg

 

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Greg Warchol is a professor of criminal justice at Northern Michigan University. His specialty is wildlife conservation criminology including the illegal trade in endangered African species. Prior to his academic career he was a statistician for the National Crime Victimization Survey, Bureau of Justice Statistics in Washington, D.C. and a supervisor in the Asset Forfeiture Unit, U.S. Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL.

 


On Rorotoko:


On his book Exploiting the Wilderness: An Analysis of Wildlife Crime
(Our Cover Feature of March 05, 2018)